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US finds dumping, subsidisation of glycine imports from India, China, Japan

As per the US, exporters from India and Japan have sold glycine at less than fair value, at rates ranging between 7.75-10.86% and 53.66-86.22%, respectively.

NEW DELHI: The US Department of Commerce has announced its final determinations in the antidumping duty and countervailing duty investigations of imports of glycine from India, accusing Indian exporters for selling glycine at less than fair value in the US.

Dumping occurs when a foreign company sells a product at less than its fair value in another country. A countervailable subsidy is financial assistance from foreign governments that benefits the production of goods from foreign companies. It is limited to specific enterprises or industries, or is contingent either upon export performance or upon the use of domestic goods over imported goods.

As per the US, exporters from India and Japan have sold glycine at less than fair value, at rates ranging between 7.75-10.86% and 53.66-86.22%, respectively.

Glycine is a chemical which is used as a sweetener or taste enhancer, metal complexing agent, dietary supplement, and is used in certain pharmaceuticals.

The US commerce department also determined that exporters from India and China received countervailable subsidies at rates of 3.03-6.99% and 144.01%, respectively.

In 2017, US’ imports of glycine from China, India, and Japan were valued at an estimated $1.1 million, $6.7 million, and $9.5 million, respectively.

After the commerce department’s findings, the US International Trade Commission will make its final determinations on June 10. If the commission makes affirmative final determinations that imports of glycine from these countries materially injure, or threaten material injury to, the domestic industry, the department of commerce will issue anti-dumping and countervailing duty orders.

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